How To Spy On A Suitor Without Looking Like You’re Trying

fatwomanspyImagine attending a performance at the Theatre Royal, and you discover the object of your affection is sitting in a box to your right. You have no desire to make a spectacle of yourself by leaning out of your box to see who they are with, so you take out what appears to be a straight-barrel spyglass and point it at the stage. While it looks as if you are focusing your attention on the performance, the ingenious spyglass you are holding is allowing you to watch the people in the box to your right. Now you can stare to your heart’s content and no one will be the wiser.

While researching a pair of antique opera glasses this past week, I stumbled across a fun accessory I’d never heard of, known as the “jealousy glass.” It looks like a single barrel opera or field-glass, but it actually contains an oblique lens and side aperture that allows the user to discretely see what is happening to their left or right.

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The jealousy glass, also known as a polemoscope, was invented by the German-Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius in 1637. Hevelius believed his invention could have military uses, but the viewing angle was found to be too narrow. During the 18th century, the general population began using the polemoscope to spy on other people.

Jealousy Glass c.1750-1770

As time went on and the demand for jealousy glasses increased, innovations were made to Hevelius’s original design. The jealousy glass pictured above was made in France and dates from 1750-1770. It has a brass eyepiece and blue enamel casing with white decorative embellishments. A hinged “lens cover” conceals a storage compartment that was probably used for snuff or a pomade. The oval mirror with a surrounding green cord opens to the side and allows the user to view the reflected image.

 Jealousy Glass (English, c. 1760)

Jealousy glasses were also designed with specific genders in mind. This jealousy glass is from England and was made in 1760. It was specifically designed for a gentleman and holds a number of accoutrements. The brass body is covered in green stained snakeskin, and there is a magnetic compass set into the brass cap. The core contains a gentleman’s manicure set and includes nail scissors, a hinged ivory note-slide, a pencil, folding knife, needle and tweezers with a file handle. It reminds me of an 18th century version of a Swiss Army Knife.

Jealousy Glass (French, early 19th century)

The ladies also had jealousy glasses created especially for them. This early 19th century jealousy glass was made in Paris by Bointaburet. It contains a pill case under the lid and a miniature scent bottle just 2cm wide that fits within the barrel. Should the behavior of a certain gentleman cause a lady to swoon, the bottle’s contents could help revive her.

Source used:

The College of Optometrists: http://www.college-optometrists.org/en/college/museyeum/online_exhibitions/optical_entertainment/jealousy.cfm

6 thoughts on “How To Spy On A Suitor Without Looking Like You’re Trying

  1. Hello Laurie,

    I think high school kids could still need a jealousy glass. I hope u are planning on using it in your manuscript. It sounds like a humorous scene could be pulled off from your blog post. Thanks for sharing.
    Mia

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    • Hi Mia,
      Thanks for stopping by. The moment I read about jealousy glasses, I wanted to revise a scene I already wrote so I could have one of my characters use one. I think this little item holds endless possibilities. If jealousy glasses were around when I was in high school, I definitely would have used one in my biology lab class. 😉

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  2. I love this piece, Laurie. I think it shows great cleverness on your part to highlight an obscure accoutrement such as this—one that most of us have never heard of. This little device shows what an interesting, rich, nuanced time period the Georgian–Regency period was in England’s history. I wish you and your writing the best. —Chris

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    • Thank you for your kind words, Chris. I love uncovering these little surprises of life during the early nineteenth century. The jealousy glasses reminded me of twentieth century women who would look in their compacts to study the men behind them. I think it shows the consistency in human nature. Thanks for stopping by. 🙂

      Like

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